Big Faith

by Christina Rose

He replied, ‘Because you have so little faith. Truly I tell you, if you have faith as small as a mustard seed, you can say to this mountain, ‘Move from here to there,’ and it will move. Nothing will be impossible for you.’” Matthew 17:20 NIV

My niece gave birth to her first child in a fierce whiteout blizzard in South Dakota.  It was impossible to reach the hospital as they lived in a remote area. Tica settled into the bathtub with towels while Dusty called her mother Karla, a labor and delivery nurse.  Dusty stayed on the phone while Karla coached the young couple through labor.  After several hours little Faith was brought into the world, perfectly healthy, while the swirling wind and snow continued to rage outside.

A few years later, I was visiting and passed three year-old Faith on the stairway.  “Oh my,” I said, “There’s little Faith!”

She climbed a few stairs to reach my height, and her big blue eyes stared directly into mine. “I’m not little Faith, I’m big Faith!” she boldly announced. She continued to march up the stairs and glanced back at me as if to say, “Don’t ever call me little Faith again!” In that moment Faith taught me that there is nothing small about faith of any size, we just have to own it and declare it.

David, the scrawny shepherd boy, declared his faith when he defeated the giant Goliath with merely a small stone and slingshot. It looked impossible that he could slay him, yet he did.  “ David said to the Philistine, ‘You come against me with sword and spear and javelin, but I come against you in the name of the Lord Almighty, the God of the armies of Israel, whom you have defied’ ” (1 Samuel 17:45 NIV).

Moses led the Israelites to safety by faith in following God’s commands. Then the Lord said to Moses, ‘Why are you crying out to me? Tell the Israelites to move on. Raise your staff and stretch out your hand over the sea to divide the water so that the Israelites can go through the sea on dry ground’” (Exodus 14:15-16 NIV). Once they were safely through, Moses faithfully followed God’s command to raise his hand over the sea, and it swallowed up the Egyptians who were trying to kill them.

Queen Esther risked her life when she dared to request an audience before the king. She had faith that her purpose was to boldly step forward on behalf of her people, and they were spared.  “For if you remain silent at this time, relief and deliverance for the Jews will arise from another place, but you and your father’s family will perish. And who knows but that you have come to royal position for such a time as this?”  (Esther 4:14 NIV).

There was a woman who could not stop bleeding for twelve years, and no one could heal her.  She knew that Jesus was passing by, and although the crowd was overwhelming, she believed that if she could just touch him she would be healed. She fought through the crowds, came up behind Jesus and touched the edge of his cloak. Instantly her bleeding stopped and she was healed. “Jesus said to her, ‘Daughter your faith has healed you.  Go in peace and be freed from  your suffering.’”  Mark 5:34 NIV.

The Bible is full of testimonies of faith. Jesus told His disciples that trusting God was the key to tapping into His power. “Have faith in God…truly I tell you, if anyone says to this mountain, ‘Go, throw yourself into the sea,’ and does not doubt in their heart but believes that what they say will happen, it will be done for them. Therefore I tell you, whatever you ask for in prayer, believe that you have received it, and it will be yours”(Mark 11:22-24 NIV).

Life throws us tests that we would never have imagined. Some days it feels as though we’re slaying giants and crossing stormy seas. But as Jesus tells us, faith as small as a mustard seed is big enough to enable us to do whatever God asks of us in serving Him and His perfect plan. “Now faith is confidence in what we hope for and assurance about what we do not see.”  Hebrews 11:1.

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Big Faith – inspiration from Christina Rose on @AriseDailyDevo (Click to Tweet)

christina roseAbout the author: Christina Rose is an author, trainer and speaker certified by the John Maxwell Team of Leadership.  She is a DAR (Daughter of the American Revolution) whose ancestors fought in the Revolutionary War. A devoted mom of two daughters and great aunt to over 40 nieces and nephews, Christina loves spending time in nature and hosting gatherings for family and friends.

Christina’s book, My Appeal to Heaven, is her story. Her marriage in shambles, Christina finds herself in a desperate situation with no resources other than herself. After appealing to heaven, the Lord takes her on a journey of awakening and miraculous empowerment. That power that is available to us all, especially those who are in need of hope and freedom.

Join the conversation: Do you have a story of when God carried you through a challenge? Please share!

What NOT to Say to a Drama Queen

by Julie Zine Coleman @JulieZColeman

I recently had a conversation with someone who volunteers in a nonprofit organization. Something she said sent up red flags for me. She was complaining about her clients, who were so dramatic over trivial problems. “Everything that happens to them sends them into a tizzy, even the smallest things. So I just tell them: you need to have more faith.”

Not the best response.

First off, the people she is serving have not had easy lives. Many have experienced major trauma somewhere along the way. Many have only recently come to know the Lord and are only now learning what healthy looks like. From my (albeit brief) foray into counseling training, I learned that trauma victims react strongly to “small” things for a reason. On a scale of 0-10, what would barely register at a 1-2 for a healthy person can be a 10 for the traumatized. Why? While a normal baseline is 0, the traumatized are living life at a steady 7 or 8. Unresolved trauma keeps them on continual fight-or-flight mode. So it doesn’t take much to get them to 10.

In ministering to someone in the healing process, one of the least compassionate things we can say is “you have to have more faith.” Because in doing so, we will only add to their burden, which is already too much to bear. It’s just one more way they are not measuring up. So while “you need to have more faith” might sound like good advice, it’s actually more damaging than helpful.

Second, Jesus said if we have faith the size of a mustard seed, “you will say to this mountain, ‘Move from here to there,’ and it will move; and nothing will be impossible to you” (Matthew 17:20). Faith as small as a tiny mustard seed is enough. Faith is not quantified in the Bible. You believe or you don’t. It is the line in the sand that sets believers apart from those who have not believed. It’s the only difference between saved and perishing.

Where believers struggle is not in how hard they believe. The problem is in doubting the object of our faith, in thinking Him to be only selectively involved in our lives. That while He may be capable, He is not concerned with the little things that matter to us. After all, we all prioritize what deserves our attention. You can’t jump at every little thing.

That’s true for us…but not for God. He knows the number of hairs on our head (Matthew 10:30). He knows when a sparrow, the commonest of birds, falls (Matthew 10:29-31). He knows what we are about to say before we say it (Psalm 139:4). He holds our tears in a bottle (Psalm 56:8). He is a Heavenly Father who delights in His people and gives good gifts to His children (Psalm 149:4, Matthew 7:11). He is a God who is INVOLVED. In all of it. Even the things that might seem too trite to bring before Him. (Because really, what would seem big to God, anyway?)

So the answer to trusting Him in the “little” things is to learn about His intimate care for us. That He is not only capable, but interested. The better we know Him, the better we can trust Him.

After the conversation, I started thinking about what would have been a proper response to that volunteer. How should I have responded to  her frustration? (I am very good at “I should have said”s. In fact, it may be my spiritual gift.) What could she say to help someone on the path to healing? What would I have said if I were confronted with the same drama?

Thinking through what I know about God gave me the answer. I could encourage them with what I just listed about Him above. I could let them know that what is important to them is important to Him. That we can trust Him, no matter what is smacking us in the face at the moment. Because He is a God of details. And He is good.

There’s no burden in knowing God better. There’s no guilt induced for someone in hearing how deserving He is of our trust. And maybe, after receiving that encouragement, they will gain ability to place what has sent them into crisis into His capable hands.

Incline your ear to me, rescue me quickly; be to me a rock of strength, a stronghold to save me. For you are my rock and my fortress, for Your name’s sake You will lead me and guide me. Psalm 31:3-4 NASB

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What NOT to Say to a Drama Queen – @JulieZColeman on @AriseDailyDevo (Click to Tweet)

Julie-Coleman-headshot-295x300About the authorJulie Coleman helps others to understand and know an unexpected God. A popular conference and retreat speaker, she holds an M.A. in biblical studies. Julie is the managing editor for Arise Daily. When she is not glaring at her computer, she spends time with her grandchildren, gardening, or walking her neurotic dog. More on Julie can be found at unexpectedgod.com and Facebook.

Does the Bible depict women as second-class citizens of the Kingdom? Jesus didn’t think so. Unexpected Love takes a look at the encounters that Jesus had with women in the gospels. You will fall in love with the dynamic, beautiful, and unexpectedly personal Jesus.

Join the conversation: What do you know about God that could be an encouragement to others?

Faith for Miracles

by Debb Hackett @debb_hackett

Last fall, my ten-year-old daughter needed two rounds of reconstructive ear surgery. She’s had problems since she was a toddler and has worn hefty hearing aids since she was four. Friends told me they were believing and praying for miraculous restoration, but in all honesty, I found I couldn’t.

I know Jesus loves me, and I know He loves my daughter, formed her in my womb, and has numbered each hair on her head. I had all kinds of faith for miracles in the lives of others, but none for my own family. I was too scared.

 My problem wasn’t believing that He could, it was trusting that He would. I had forgotten how much Jesus loves my daughter. More than even me.

“For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life (John 3:16 NIV).”

We have just celebrated the glory of the resurrection. God not only showing His power, but His all-encompassing love. He loved us all the way to the cross. And not just at the cross, but in our present everyday struggles and successes, too.

A few weeks later, with tear-filled eyes, I dropped her off at the carpool stop and watched her bounce into school without hearing aids for the first time ever. That was when I dared to believe I had witnessed something incredible. She was well. At that moment, I finally stopped being a coward and started calling it what it was all along: a miracle.

My situation and reaction reminded me of Elizabeth, Mary, Simeon, and Anna (see Luke 1-2). Four people who were waiting in eager anticipation for Jesus. Nowhere in Scripture do we see them uncertain about whether He was coming, or if He would indeed be the King they anticipated. They expected something miraculous, and look at what they got. A King who defeated death and saved His people from their sins. One who would rule for eternity.

So now I’m trying something different: I’ve made a spiritual resolution. I’ve walked with the Lord for over thirty years and have seen amazing things happen first-hand. I’ve heard even more stories of the Lord saving, providing for, healing, or setting people free. In 2018, when one of my close friends was diagnosed with advanced ovarian cancer, this time I waited expectantly for miracles. Sure enough, there have been, praise God. Despite being too ill to complete all the chemotherapy, there was no sign of any cancer in her body at the most recent scan.

As the trials come (and Jesus did warn us about the trials), I am determined to see them as opportunities for the Lord to show off His love.

…Truly I say to you, if you have faith the size of a mustard seed, you will say to this mountain, ‘Move from here to there,’ and it will move; and nothing will be impossible to you.   Matthew 17:20 NASB

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Faith for Miracles – insight and honesty from @Debb_Hackett on @AriseDailyDevo (Click to Tweet)

Deb HackettAbout the author: Writer, broadcaster and speaker Debb Hackett  has been a radio journalist for more than twenty years. Married to a test pilot, Debb writes for military wives and lives just outside Washington DC with her husband and children. She’s having lots of fun working on an inspirational contemporary romance series. When she’s not writing, Debb can be found leading worship, playing bass, or skiing. Also, if you can swing by her house while she’s making scones, that would be a win. She blogs at: http://debbhackett.com

Join the conversation: What are you trusting God for right now?