Password: Truth

by Rhonda Rhea @RhondaRhea

Password anxiety. I’m pretty sure that’s a thing. You’re compelled to choose seven un-guessable characters, throw in some capital letters, add the name of a dead pet, sprinkle in a few lower-case letters, include some numerals, and, on the whole, the password should eventually grow and evolve into an even better password. Essentially, it should ultimately be able to beat up all the other passwords—make them run crying from the yard.

Anytime I have to choose a new password, my fingers hover over the keys for a solid five minutes. My sweaty fingers. Though I do try to hide any fear. Because I’ve heard the most evolved passwords can sense it.

It’s not that I’m a fearful person. Okay, as a child I might’ve been the only kid whose blanket fort had a panic room. But as an adult, fear isn’t such an issue.

Maybe that’s because as a follower of Christ, I know the password for conquering fear. Truth. That’s it. It doesn’t matter what you capitalize or how many numbers you add. Anytime we’re afraid, we find strength as we remember what is true, and by faith we hold onto that truth.

Isaiah 41:10 holds the no-fear message: “Do not fear, for I am with you; do not be afraid, for I am your God. I will strengthen you; I will help you; I will hold on to you with My righteous right hand” (HCSB). The truth is, God gives us the strength for no-fear living as we remember and believe that He holds onto us. Combine the password of truth with faith and trust, and then fear? It runs crying from the yard.

David wrote, “When I am afraid, I will trust in You. In God, whose word I praise, in God I trust; I will not fear. What can man do to me?” (Psalm 56:3-4, HCSB).

Fear, worry, anxiety. They’re emotional responses. Our emotions can be sneaky. It often feels impossible to reason with the rascals. And they’re insistent. It’s not like we invite fear to take us over. It just does. But our emotions must be taught the truth. By faith, we must believe that despite what our emotions are telling us, the indisputable truth is that we don’t need to fear.

Think of the things that cause you anxiety. Is there anything you’ve thought of that’s too big for God? Anything that’s too hard for Him?

Financial stresses? He owns everything. Health issues? He knit your body together. Too much to do? He holds time in His hands. Whatever the source of your stress, the Father loves you and it’s His loving desire to shoulder your burden and squelch your fear. “Casting all your cares [all your anxieties, all your worries, and all your concerns, once and for all] on Him, for He cares about you [with deepest affection, and watches over you very carefully]” (1 Peter 5:7, AMP).

Our mighty God, the One who lovingly cares for you, is bigger than anything you could ever fear. He is the firewall of all firewalls, as it were, protecting your soul. Wrapping our minds around that truth in faith will delete fear every time. By faith, remember, understand, believe the password:  Truth.

As for your other passwords? You might as well also understand that when you finally choose one that’s remote enough to be secure, the chances of you remembering it are even more remote than that.

Finally brothers, whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is commendable—if there is any moral excellence and if there is any praise—dwell on these things.                                            Philippians 4:8 HCSB

TWEETABLE
Password: Truth – insight on #followingGod from @RhondaRhea on @AriseDailyDevo (Click to Tweet)

rhonda rheaAbout the author: Rhonda Rhea is a TV personality for Christian Television Network and a humor columnist for great magazines such as HomeLife, Leading Hearts, The Pathway and many more. She is the author of 12 books, including Fix-Her-Upperco-authored with Beth Duewel, and a hilarious novel, Turtles in the Roadco-authored with her daughter, Kaley Rhea. Rhonda and Kaley are also excited to be teaming up with Bridges TV host, Monica Schmelter, for a new book and TV series titled, Messy to Meaningful—Lessons from the Junk Drawer. Rhonda enjoys speaking at conferences and events from coast to coast and serves as a consultant for Bold Vision Books. She lives near St. Louis with her pastor/hubs and has five grown, mostly-coffee-drinking children. You can read more from Rhonda on her website or Facebook page.

Join the conversation: With what fears do you struggle? What truth can help you overcome that fear?

Even the Little Things

by Kathy Howard @KathyHHoward

One day in the grocery store, I was caught in the fallout of the prevalent “I don’t need a cart” mentality. As I perused the apples, I noticed a man carrying four 2-liter bottles of soda in his arms. Just as he passed me, one of the large bottles slipped from his arms and hit the tile floor. The angle of the impact was just right to be wrong – for me.

The lid popped off and a powerful shower of Coca Cola covered me and my cart. The man glanced at me, shrugged his shoulders, and said, “Huh. Who would’ve thought that would happen.” Then he walked away. No apology. No offer to get me a paper towel. When I got home, I not only had to take a shower, I also had to wash all my groceries before I put them away.

Okay, I’ll confess. Many times, I too have gone into the grocery store and decided against getting a cart because I “only need a couple of things.” As I rush down the aisles to get the bread, milk, and bananas I usually end up seeing other things I really need too. Then before you know it my arms are overloaded and I end up leaving a trail of things behind me as I make my way to the checkout line.

Unfortunately, I do the same thing with life’s little problems and stresses. When just one or two small things come along I often fail to turn them over to God. “I can handle that… and I can handle that…” But before I know it I’m weighed down with a myriad of things I really can’t handle on my own.

If you are anything like me you may sometimes find it harder to cope with life’s little things than the major trials. I trust too much in myself and too little in God. In my sinful independence and arrogance I think, “I can do this. I don’t really need to bother God with this one.” But when I fail to give everything to God right away – no matter how seemingly insignificant – all those little things tend to mount up into one giant mess.

Are you weary from trying to carry an armload of life’s troubles all by yourself? Jesus urges us to bring all our burdens to Him:

Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give your rest. Take my yoke upon you and learn from me, for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy and my burden is light. Matthew 11:28-30 NIV

David, the shepherd boy and great king of Israel, intimately knew the great Burden Bearer: Cast your cares on the LORD and He will sustain you; He will never let the righteous fall.  Psalm 55:22 NIV

So did the Apostle Peter: Cast all your anxiety on Him because He cares for you. 1 Peter 5:7 NIV

Don’t wait until you’re buried under a pile of cares before you come to Jesus. Bring the first one and every one to Him.

TWEETABLE
The Importance of Remembering to Turn to God Even in The Little Things – wisdom from @KathyHHoward on @AriseDailyDevo (Click to Tweet)

Kathy HowardAbout the author: Kathy Howard encourages women to live an unshakable faith for life by standing firm on our rock-solid God no matter life’s circumstances. The author of 8 books and a former “cultural Christian,” Kathy has a Masters in Christian Education. Kathy and her husband have 3 married children and 4 grandsons. Find out more and get free discipleship tools and leader helps at her website: www.kathyhoward.org.

Join the conversation: What do you need to bring to Him today?

 

Becoming a Warrior Instead of a Worrier

by Edie Melson

You keep him in perfect peace whose mind is stayed on you, because he trusts in you. Isaiah 26:3 (ESV)

To be perfectly honest, I’m both a worrier and a warrior. I hate when the worrier in me raises its ugly head but ignoring it doesn’t make it go away. It’s only when I acknowledge the tendency, that I can fight it effectively. My hardest battles against worry come in the arena of parenting.

My sons are grown men—capable and wise—and yet I still find myself fearful about some of the things they choose to do. Several years ago two of them decided to spend an afternoon kayaking on a nearby river. They’re experienced outdoorsmen and have logged hundreds of hours doing that very thing. But for some reason that particular trip made me uneasy.

I found myself at a familiar crossroads with a choice to make.

My boys—like all sons—don’t appreciate the love behind my worries. And experience has taught me that nagging does absolutely nothing except make them more determined to do the thing I dread. I could either worry and nag, or I could go into what I’ve come to call warrior mode. This particular practice is how I refer to certain times of prayer. It’s more intense than just devotional praying. That day I chose warrior. I wished them well, warned them to make wise decisions, and retired to my room for some serious prayer intervention on their behalf.

As I talked out my fears and my feelings with God, a peace came over me. Worry dissolved and I went back to my regular routine. I slept like a baby, but the next morning I discovered why I’d felt such a need to pray.

When they’d put into the river, it had been a sunny day. The clouds were fluffy and the water calm. Several miles into this idyllic venture a sudden summer thunderstorm came up almost out of nowhere. Before they could put to shore, the lightning began and their world went black.

Three hours later they awoke, out of their boats—thankful for the life vests they wore—and covered in scrapes and burns. They’d been struck by lightning.

They made it back to their truck and limped home to their wives. They were shaken up, but fine.

Their experience reminded me that even though my children are grown, they still need me. I could have voiced my fears that day, but the outcome would have been the same. Instead I learned the value of a solid set of knee pads and the readiness to do battle for them in prayer. When I take my worries to God, I put them in the hands of the One who could keep them safe.

Edie-MelsonAbout the author: Find your voice, live your story…is the foundation of Edie Melson’s message, whether she’s addressing parents, military families, readers of fiction or writers. As an author, blogger, and speaker, she’s encouraged and challenged audiences across the country and around the world. Her latest book, While My Child is Away; Prayers for While Were Apart is available at local retailers and online. Connect with her further at www.EdieMelson.com and on Facebook and Twitter.

Free Book Contest!  Arise Daily will use a random number generator to pick a winner from today’s comments. To enter our contest for Edie’s book, While My Child is Away,  please comment below.  By posting in our comments, you are giving us permission to share your name if you win!  If you have an outside the US mailing address, your prize could be substituted with an e-book of our choice.

Join the conversation: 1 Peter 5:7 says to “Cast all your anxiety on him because he cares for you.” What fears have you given to the Lord? What are you still having trouble relinquishing?